Featured Resource

Response to Global HIV and HCV Epidemics

PH 290.11 Session 12 caps the course's lecture content by recruiting three global health giants to discuss the role and responsibilities of public and private organizations in the response to the global HIV and HCV epidemics. From policy advances to facilitate access to life saving antiretrovirals for millions of patients, to challenges in regulatory infrastructure, to the rocky path for point-of-care diagnostics and treatment monitoring technologies, to the recognition that treatment is prevention and key to any containment strategy -- the lessons provided by the expansion and entrenchment of the HIV epidemic, and successes and failures in the public health response are unparalleled in the global health arena. The hesitant but nascent recognition that the HCV epidemic offers equally imperative opportunities and deserves just as strong a response is a chance to reflect on these lessons and find ways to move forward without stumbling on many of the issues already encountered in HIV. The perspectives and reflections of these three global health leaders on these topics provide an exclusive and unique window on global health and will be of great interest to the wider Berkeley, UCSF and Bay Area community.

Grounded in the work of the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, PH 290.11 introduces Berkeley and UCSF students, visiting scholars and post-docs to the basics of drug development and regulatory policies emphasizing the role and benefit of multi-stakeholder engagement. Students and VSPA affiliates have learned how the US Food and Drug Administration responded to the public health challenge presented by the HIV and HCV epidemics by adapting regulatory policies to expedite and accelerate drug approval so that more patients could access life-prolonging and life-saving drugs. The course includes guest lecturers from the Forum's academic and biotech partners in the Bay Area. The course, taught by instructors Veronica Miller and Jur Strobos, is designed for students and postdocs interested in careers in biotech, regulatory science or federal health policy. 2014 PH 290.11 Syllabus.

Session 12 (expanded attendance) and video-taping sponsored by the Center for Emerging and Neglected Diseases (CEND), Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research, School of Public Health and Visiting Scholars Post-Doctoral Affairs (VSPA).

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The Many Faces of Aging In America

Founded in 1950, the National Council on Aging (NCOA) is a nonprofit organization with a national network of more than 14,000 organizations and leaders. Our members include senior centers, area agencies on aging, adult day service centers, faith-based service organizations, senior housing facilities, employment services, consumer groups, and leaders from academia, business, and labor.

Our programs help older people remain healthy and independent, find jobs, increase access to benefits programs, and discover meaningful ways to continue contributing to society.

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Basic Immunology: Nuts and Bolts of the Immune System

Dr. Anthony DeFranco explores basic immunology, looking at the cells in the immune system, what they do and how they work.


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What in the Health Is Public Health?

When you're sick, you go to the doctor and the doctor treats your disease. They've been trained to do that pretty well. But what do you do when you're healthy? Well, you probably just go about your day. You've got a busy life, we all do. And you can't afford to be sick.

So what if I told you there are people out there whose job it is to make sure you stay healthy? And what if I told you these are people you've probably never met? Well, these folks are in a field called public health. And their mission is to promote health and prevent disease. Doctors, on the other hand, are on a mission to treat disease.

So let's say this person is diagnosed with diabetes. Now it's the doctor's job to treat her patient. She'll prescribe medications and insulin to help him meet his target blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, he'll have to keep going back for prescriptions for the rest of his life because there is no cure. To make matters worse, he will have to deal with issues like long-term health complications, health insurance concerns, and even social discrimination. And don't forget his medical bill, almost fourteen thousand dollars a year. His priorities in life are now secondary to his disease. Sure, modern medicine has come a long way. But is this the best way to address disease?

Well, let's take a step back and focus on preventing disease. According to public health researchers, simple things like a healthy diet and regular exercise can help prevent the onset of diabetes. So public health folks put their health promotion and disease prevention mission to work. They lower the prices of healthier foods and beverages in school cafeterias to promote a healthy diet. And they build community sidewalks, trails, and bike lanes to promote exercise. And at a fraction of the cost of disease treatment, public health makes it really easy for people to stay healthy in the first place. No diabetes means no long-term health complications, no health insurance concerns, and no social discrimination. Just health promotion and disease prevention.

And the crazy thing is, it works. Really well. Because people you've never met, people you've never even talked to, devote their time to make sure you stay healthy.

Read More

Video Focus

Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City

Last fall, black dust began to blow through residential neighborhoods on the southeast side of Chicago. Only it wasn't really dust; it was a fine black residue that clung to everything it touched, including noses and throats. Residents eventually learned that it was an oil byproduct called petroleum coke — petcoke for short — and it was being stored in massive uncovered piles at facilities owned by the Koch brothers. VICE News's Danny Gold traveled to Chicago to see what happens when clouds of toxic oil dust blow through the Windy City.

More.

Public Health 101

What in the Health Is Public Health?

When you're sick, you go to the doctor and the doctor treats your disease. They've been trained to do that pretty well. But what do you do when you're healthy? Well, you probably just go about your day. You've got a busy life, we all do. And you can't afford to be sick.

So what if I told you there are people out there whose job it is to make sure you stay healthy? And what if I told you these are people you've probably never met? Well, these folks are in a field called public health. And their mission is to promote health and prevent disease. Doctors, on the other hand, are on a mission to treat disease.

So let's say this person is diagnosed with diabetes. Now it's the doctor's job to treat her patient. She'll prescribe medications and insulin to help him meet his target blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, he'll have to keep going back for prescriptions for the rest of his life because there is no cure. To make matters worse, he will have to deal with issues like long-term health complications, health insurance concerns, and even social discrimination. And don't forget his medical bill, almost fourteen thousand dollars a year. His priorities in life are now secondary to his disease. Sure, modern medicine has come a long way. But is this the best way to address disease?

Well, let's take a step back and focus on preventing disease. According to public health researchers, simple things like a healthy diet and regular exercise can help prevent the onset of diabetes. So public health folks put their health promotion and disease prevention mission to work. They lower the prices of healthier foods and beverages in school cafeterias to promote a healthy diet. And they build community sidewalks, trails, and bike lanes to promote exercise. And at a fraction of the cost of disease treatment, public health makes it really easy for people to stay healthy in the first place. No diabetes means no long-term health complications, no health insurance concerns, and no social discrimination. Just health promotion and disease prevention.

And the crazy thing is, it works. Really well. Because people you've never met, people you've never even talked to, devote their time to make sure you stay healthy.
More.

Epidemiology & BioStatistics

Basic Immunology: Nuts and Bolts of the Immune System

Dr. Anthony DeFranco explores basic immunology, looking at the cells in the immune system, what they do and how they work.

More.

Health Behavior

Health Belief Model

An overview of the Health Belief Model, one of the most common models in the public health field. More.

Health Services

Payment Reform to Improve Patient Care

James Robinson, Director of the Berkeley Center for Health Technology, uses US examples to discuss how payment reform can be used to promote integration and raise the quality of patient care.

More.

Community Health

The Many Faces of Aging In America

Founded in 1950, the National Council on Aging (NCOA) is a nonprofit organization with a national network of more than 14,000 organizations and leaders. Our members include senior centers, area agencies on aging, adult day service centers, faith-based service organizations, senior housing facilities, employment services, consumer groups, and leaders from academia, business, and labor.

Our programs help older people remain healthy and independent, find jobs, increase access to benefits programs, and discover meaningful ways to continue contributing to society.
More.

Environmental Health

Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City

Last fall, black dust began to blow through residential neighborhoods on the southeast side of Chicago. Only it wasn't really dust; it was a fine black residue that clung to everything it touched, including noses and throats. Residents eventually learned that it was an oil byproduct called petroleum coke — petcoke for short — and it was being stored in massive uncovered piles at facilities owned by the Koch brothers. VICE News's Danny Gold traveled to Chicago to see what happens when clouds of toxic oil dust blow through the Windy City.

More.

Global Health

Response to Global HIV and HCV Epidemics

PH 290.11 Session 12 caps the course's lecture content by recruiting three global health giants to discuss the role and responsibilities of public and private organizations in the response to the global HIV and HCV epidemics. From policy advances to facilitate access to life saving antiretrovirals for millions of patients, to challenges in regulatory infrastructure, to the rocky path for point-of-care diagnostics and treatment monitoring technologies, to the recognition that treatment is prevention and key to any containment strategy -- the lessons provided by the expansion and entrenchment of the HIV epidemic, and successes and failures in the public health response are unparalleled in the global health arena. The hesitant but nascent recognition that the HCV epidemic offers equally imperative opportunities and deserves just as strong a response is a chance to reflect on these lessons and find ways to move forward without stumbling on many of the issues already encountered in HIV. The perspectives and reflections of these three global health leaders on these topics provide an exclusive and unique window on global health and will be of great interest to the wider Berkeley, UCSF and Bay Area community.

Grounded in the work of the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, PH 290.11 introduces Berkeley and UCSF students, visiting scholars and post-docs to the basics of drug development and regulatory policies emphasizing the role and benefit of multi-stakeholder engagement. Students and VSPA affiliates have learned how the US Food and Drug Administration responded to the public health challenge presented by the HIV and HCV epidemics by adapting regulatory policies to expedite and accelerate drug approval so that more patients could access life-prolonging and life-saving drugs. The course includes guest lecturers from the Forum's academic and biotech partners in the Bay Area. The course, taught by instructors Veronica Miller and Jur Strobos, is designed for students and postdocs interested in careers in biotech, regulatory science or federal health policy. 2014 PH 290.11 Syllabus.

Session 12 (expanded attendance) and video-taping sponsored by the Center for Emerging and Neglected Diseases (CEND), Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research, School of Public Health and Visiting Scholars Post-Doctoral Affairs (VSPA).
More.