Featured Resource

Beyond the Data: Childhood Immunization as a Tool to Address Health Disparities

In this month's Grand Rounds Beyond the Data, Dr. John Iskander and Marion McDonald discuss methods to further address health disparities through childhood immunizations -- Knowledge of disease outbreaks and patterns in the community; Learning the culture and language of population served; and Streamlined immunization visits.
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Epidemiology Study Types: Cohort and Case-Control

What makes a cohort vs. a case-control study? Find out in this video.
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How Well Do You Know the Flu?

Dr. Joe Bresee with CDC's Influenza Division addresses common questions and misconceptions about the flu and the flu vaccine. This video is intended for general audiences as well as health care professionals. For more information related to flu and the flu vaccine, please visit the CDC Seasonal Influenza (flu) web site at http://www.cdc.gov/flu.
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We Heard the Bells: The Influenza of 1918

In 1918-1919, the worst flu in recorded history killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide. The U.S. death toll was 675,000 - five times the number of U.S. soldiers killed in World War I. Where did the 1918 flu come from? Why was it so lethal? What did we learn?
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Bringing the Public into Public Health

Dr. Michael Johansson of the CDC Dengue Branch describes the use of internet-based participatory surveillance to collect community health data. Participatory surveillance is a public health surveillance method that directly questions people in a community about their health rather than relying on more traditional physician based health reporting.
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Video Focus

A Guerilla Gardener in South Central LA

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys." More.

Public Health 101

We Heard the Bells: The Influenza of 1918

In 1918-1919, the worst flu in recorded history killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide. The U.S. death toll was 675,000 - five times the number of U.S. soldiers killed in World War I. Where did the 1918 flu come from? Why was it so lethal? What did we learn? More.

Epidemiology & BioStatistics

Competency-based Informatics Training at CDC

One of the first capacity-building programs on public health informatics emanated from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now on its tenth year, the program has expanded as planned to city and state health departments. More.

Health Behavior

Ten Distinguishing Ideas for Health Communication in the 21st Century

This presentation draws upon my book, Health Communication: From Theory to Practice, Second Edition, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, an imprint of Wiley, 2013. It was given as part of a Sept. 10, 2014 Author's Night at the New York Academy of Medicine. More.

Health Services

Accountable Care: It's All About the Relationships

A keynote address by Dr. Elliot Fisher at the second annual RCRC Roundtable hosted by the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice on behalf of the Relational Coordination Research Collaborative at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management. More.

Community Health

A Guerilla Gardener in South Central LA

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys." More.

Environmental Health

Community Health Impacts of Factory Farms

Steve Wing received his Ph.D. in epidemiology from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he is currently an associate professor. Recent work has focused on environmental injustice and health effects of ionizing radiation, industrial animal production, sewage sludge, and landfills. He has collaborated on health and exposure studies with communities and workers impacted by threats to environmental and occupational health. More.

Global Health

Investing in Global Health Systems: Sustaining Gains, Transforming Lives

Health and life expectancy in poor countries have improved rapidly over a short time, contributing to a more prosperous, stable, and productive world. The United States has been a part of this success and therefore has an interest in protecting the health gains of the past few decades. In addition, the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa has drawn attention to the consequences of neglecting health systems development, as a strong health system allows for prompt response to pandemic threats and draws on the same skills and infrastructure that support routine health care. Vulnerabilities in this system pose financial, political, and health risks to developing countries and, in a larger sense, to the world.

An IOM study looked at how health systems improvements can lead to better health, reduce poverty, and make donor investment in health sustainable. The resulting report stresses the importance of the health system in making transformative investments that support health in developing countries, and outlines a broad donor strategy that can make effective use of the United States’ comparative advantage in science and technology to improve health for the world’s most vulnerable people. For more information, click here.
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